The Fruity Pop Workshop is a pop-up educational experience that takes place at farmers’ markets, community centers, and other public spaces in low-income neighborhoods. Free to the public, the project is geared toward children aged 4–11 and aims to help them form healthier relationships to food through visual art and creative practices. Working collaboratively, a teaching artist and food educator show children how to make a “Fruity Pop”—a low-cost and healthier alternative to sugary sodas and fruit juices—and how to turn the leftover fruit scraps into art-making tools or works of art! 

Artist Tattfoo Tan’s Nature Matching System Placemat, with its eighty-eight colors drawn from photographs of fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers’ markets, is used as a teaching aid to help children see connections between fresh produce and some basic building blocks of art, such as color, texture, and shape. Fruity Pop educators relay the message inherent in Tan’s object: a colorful diet is a healthy diet.

In 2015, The Fruity Pop Workshop was sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

Book us to facilitate a private workshop or to be a partner in your community outreach initiatives.


What Participants Are Saying

The work that With Food in Mind is doing is so timely and necessary in our city, which is dealing with soaring child obesity rates and reduced access to art. Not only have they cornered the market on addressing both of these epidemics, they understand that programming should be brought to where people already convene.
— Parent, Morningside Park Farmers Market
My daughter did The Fruity Pop Workshop months ago and she’s still talking about it!
— Parent, Park Slope Farmers Market
This is totally awesome.
— 9-year-old, Union Square Greenmarket
This is great because you don’t think of fruit like this.
— Parent, Jamaica Queens Farmers Market
I’ve always wanted to learn how to make my own soda. I know this [bottled soda] is bad for me.
— 12-year-old, Farragut Houses